Tag: profile

People in Glasshouses….Glasshouse Brewing Co

On Friday 8th September Josh Hughes pretty much completed the ‘circle of beer’ (apologies Lion King fans) when he hosted a tap takeover and meet the brewer for his own brewery, Glasshouse Brewing Co, where his beer journey started in Brewdog Birmingham.

I managed to grab the newest brewer on the block and ask him some questions about where he’s come from, where he is now and where he’s headed. Here’s what I learnt…

I started out by asking Josh how it had all started and he told me he’d joined the Brewdog team in June 2012 and worked at the bar for four and a half years. During that time, at James Watt’s request, he spent some time brewing on the pilot kit up at Brewdog HQ in Ellon. The big catalyst was then giving his homebrew to James and the way that not only he reacted but the whole company. “It sent a shockwave through the company” that someone in one of their bars could be brewing beer to that standard. James even said that trying this homebrew was the highlight of his time working in the bar in Birmingham!

The other thing to come out of this encounter was Josh and Neil Hemus starting the homebrew club with Josh being the sole organiser after Neil Hemus moved on. He told me that Brewdog had really wanted him to stay up in Ellon but he found the process too automated and that he wanted to get his hands dirty – that’s what brewing means to him. So that’s how Glasshouse was born.

They started on October 21st 2016 in a greenhouse in Kings Heath and if you’re wondering how the brewery got its name it’s all thanks to Josh’s niece who said “are you in the brewery today? You’re in the glasshouse brewery” and Glasshouse Beer Co. was born!

After getting set up from October the first beer was released in March this year and that’s when the brewery is really counting its birthday (so look out for celebrations next March!).

We moved on then to talk more about the brewery itself and their general ethos. Glasshouse is pretty much just Josh, he does all the recipe development and is the head brewer. He’s also assisted by Callum Marnock who’s been part of the team from the start. They are currently brewing on a one barrel kit, but a five and half barrel kit will be operational early in November with 20 barrels worth of fermentation vessels and at least one bright tank (maybe 2). The plan is to move away from keg and bottle conditioning to forced carbonation, the reason for this is to ensure the consistency of the beer. Josh told me though that they now plan to cease bottling for 2 reasons one “it’s a pain in the arse” and secondly once the new kit is up and running they’re moving into canning.

Me with Josh and Julie

I asked Josh about the breweries approach to styles and having a core range of beers as I’ve noticed that there are only a couple of his beers I’ve had more than once. “We’ve adopted a real Kernel and Cloudwater approach to experimentation. Not weighing ourselves down with a core range”. He said that he hates the labelling of beer with it having to be defined as one style or another “it’s so much more than that. I don’t like the distinction of west coast or east coast pales for example. If you want to brew a dank juicy IPA with loads of flaked oats –giving a juicy body and clean finish then go for it” There are lots of people doing this at the moment and he cited a few idols such as Deya, Verdant and Cloudwater. However he did say that sometimes he finds their beers too sweet, and since he’s a committed “hop fiend” he wants to show off the hops. He told me that he “spends time on the malt bill, so the hops can shine through. If it’s an IPA the hops should be at the front of the beer.”. Of course it can’t all be about the hops so the chocolate milk stout and, the frankly delicious, Me Julie shows they are not a one trick pony.

I moved on to ask Josh why we weren’t seeing so much of his beer around at the moment. It’s all down to his high levels of quality control “as the head brewer I have had to ensure the CO2 levels, the hop flavour over time and the way the flavour profile matures are all measured and controlled. I’ve kept stock back looking at it with a longer view.” Sometimes this has gone wrong and he’s held it back too long but that allows for the setting of a realistic best before date and will help with proper stock rotation once it gets to the bars. He also said this gives a baseline for the move to the big kit. “Ensuring that when the beer is released it’s at its optimum freshness, and that the flavour and aroma profile and CO2 levels are all perfect”.

He told me how his current role working at Clink has actually helped him with this quality control process “launching at Clink gets me unbiased feedback on the beer, 99.9% of the people drinking there don’t know I’m Glasshouse so I get unfiltered feedback direct from the customers”. He said

“It’s an ongoing research and development, it’s an ongoing discipline there is always something you can learn”.

I for one am really excited about the beers I’ve tried so far as well and the real passion and knowledge Josh displays for his craft.

I’ve got an invite to go and visit the brewery once the new kit is all up and running so watch this space for an update nearer the end of the year.

Spotlight on Punchline

Have you ever sat around with a group of friends in a pub and as the beers flowed discussed what it would be like to open your own brewery? Well for one such group it went further than a drunken discussion…We’ll come to the back story of Andy, James, Lisa, Louise and Richard in a bit but our introduction to them came on the afternoon of Saturday July 22nd when Deb and I caught the tram out to Priestfields to check out one of the newest breweries on the West Midlands block, Punchline. We knew they had taken over the premises and kit formerly owned by Gwen Sanchirico of Sacre Brew – check out previous posts here http://midlandsbeerblog.co.uk/2016/06/20/birmingham-beer-bash-profiles-sacre-brew/ and here http://midlandsbeerblog.co.uk/2017/07/10/au-revoir-sacre-brew-thank-you-and-good-bye-to-gwen/. This was their first chance to meet local drinkers and gauge some reaction to the work they have been doing for the last few months, and I think it is safe to say the reaction took them by surprise. Whilst we were there there was always a queue at the bar of drinkers of both sexes and all ages, and at one point they had to start labelling up bottles as the supply in the fridge had run out. They had 2 beers they were serving on draft, Why the Long Face, an IPA & No Eye Deer, a saison. These were complimented by 3 in bottles, Dyathinkhesaurus, an imperial porter, Sunburnt Penguin witbier, and The Other Side, a black ipa, and they ranged in abv from 6.1% to 7.7%. Between us we sampled all 5 and thoroughly enjoyed them and were pleased to see via Untappd that many others agreed. We managed to snatch brief conversations with a couple of them as things began to wind down but decided to meet at a later date for an informal chat about their beginnings. And so over a few beers in the Wolf at the end of August I dug into their history with Andy, Louise, Richard and Lisa. They described themselves as very keen drinkers whose friendship goes back a long way, Richard having known Andy from the age of 8, and they still have regular Friday night meet ups in Wednesfield where some of them are based. The first thing that I found surprising, and which they had touched on at the open day, is that none of them had been involved in the drinks trade in the past, or had done any form of home brewing (although volunteers Alastair & Lisa who were keen home brewers were onboard from the beginning). The latter had been talked about as something they were going to start doing, and that was when the name Punchline had been originally bandied about, but then an opportunity knocked as they say. James was the one who had the original connection to Gwen and she had actually helped with a 50th birthday meal when she cooked an 8 course meal with 8 of her beers to go with it. And then in January of this year she announced she was selling up, but wanted the whole brewery to go to kindred spirits who would carry on brewing in the space rather than selling off the equipment in bits and pieces. Thus came the drunken idea to buy the brewery between them with no experience. So they went and helped Gwen out at the brewery, did a collaboration brew with her, a golden ale called Fenrir 14/48 Transatlantic Beer and then learnt everything they could in the months leading up to her returning to the USA. And then it was time to start brewing on the 240 litre, 4 FV brewing kit with all the beer being brewed, kegged, bottled and labelled on the premises. Since there were 5 of them they picked the aforementioned 5 different styles saying this was partly based on their differing tastes since, for instance, Andy is not really a fan of hoppy beers and prefers the dark side, whereas Richard is a more hops the better kind of guy. With the name Punchline decided upon it came time to find a name for the beers and a design look. To do this they went to The Studio Group, a Wolverhampton-based design agency, taking with them a clear idea of simple, bold colourful designs and a lot of bad jokes.
And then it came time to let the public decide, and as mentioned above the reception was good on their open day. The first customer actually knocked the door a while before they opened and bought 12 bottles of each beer and they were still buzzing about the whole, slightly exhausting experience a few weeks later when we met them. They said about a third of the people that turned up were friends and colleagues but the rest were a mix of supporters of Gwen, local beer drinkers, and the curious. Since then they have had success at the Beer Envy stall at the Lichfield food Festival where they sold out, and placed a selection of beers in the Hungry Bistro in Wolverhampton City Centre. And now comes the next stage with their brewing procedures – and the kit itself – evolving; the fermentation room has been upgraded and there are plans to gradually upgrade the kit.
We had now come to that time of the evening to kick back and just chat about various beery adventures we’d all been on and ask the epiphany beer question: Andy and Louise (who share a love of strong, dark, continental beers) are in complete agreement on this: De Molen’s Bordeaux barrel-aged Bommen & Granaten. The beer has inspired a now annual pilgrimage to the brewery’s Borefts Beer Festival. As for Richard and Lisa, well Richard is a simple soul, liking anything with plenty of hops, in fact the hoppier the better, he said “I don’t really have an outright favourite, I’m lucky to have the Vine in Wednesfield as my local so there is always a great range of my style of beers on, difficult to pick just one” Lisa isn’t the biggest of drinkers anyway, but prefers a lighter style of ale, again nothing specific.
We ended our meet up wishing them the best of luck in the future because although these first few months have been a lot of hard work they are determined to still have fun and live up to their tag line – Seriously good beer. #No joke.

Brewery Spotlight – Fownes

Fownes Brewing Co. will be celebrating their 5th anniversary next month after what started as an idea over a few pints of beer in 2010 became a reality. Yes unlike a few brewers we’ve talked to who started off as home brewers James and Thomas were not, just drinkers who figured they could make something better than the ales they had in their local pub. This pub was the Jolly Crispin in Upper Gornal and the bar manager was someone that James knew from college who, upon hearing the idea, mentioned the landlord had said the “garage” behind the pub was ideal for such a thing. At the time James was teaching and Tom was involved in concert photography but both had the desire to do something different. So after 10 months of renovating and an intense 18 months of learning how to brew they moved in October 2012 with a tower brewing system and 3 200 litre plastic fermenters. Their first cask had been released in the July, Frost Hammer a 4.6% pale ale, which became part of their core range of 4 beers. They decided to call themselves a Dwarfen brewery, partly in reference to the small nature of their brewery, but also because of their interest in Tolkienesque fantasy and Games workshop style gaming. Thus, as brewers of Epic Tales, they have created a universe and characters for their beers with stories by Tom and illustrations by James to go along with them (they also have a professional storyteller to join them at events to perform the tragic saga of King Korvak), and found that the more unusual the name at beer festivals the more drinkers seem willing to try them. It also gives the new pump clips and bottles a distinctive look with the designs being somewhat reminiscent of Tales from the Crypt covers and Hellboy artist MikeMignola for anyone with an interest in comic books. Over the years some things have changed. At first they were going to focus on English hops but unfortunately they couldn’t get all the tastes and aromas they needed and so now incorporate more hop varieties from the US, New Zealand. Malt wise they use British malt for pale ales but have found the German company Weyermann are the best source for all their speciality malt which they are so fond of since they have over 90 different malts available. Their love of darker beers has given them a good reputation amongst beer drinkers and festival awards, especially with King Korvak’s Saga, a 5.4% porter (CAMRA’s Champion Porter of the West Midlands 2015, 2017), another core beer. As well as the 4 core beers they do a range of Special (seasonal), Limited (quarterly) and Saga Editions. The latter showcase their dark beers of which I’ve only sampled one so far, chapter IV – Downfall –  a big 9% beast of a baltic porter where 7 malts combine to give an intense, flavourful experience, but easy drinking for the abv. Since their early local beginnings they realised that they can’t really compete with a lot of the bigger micro breweries, so have endeavoured to get their beers into at least one pub in a selection of towns and cities such as Walsall, Leicester, Kidderminster, where they can be found at The Weavers Ale House, and the Wellington in Birmingham. The next step to try to get the beers more widely available in bottles and to further this they have turned to a crowdfunding initiative, which you can read about here – http://igg.me/at/fownes – We at the blog are big fans of small independent brewers so think this is well worth supporting, plus we like the beers, and in the name of transparency I will mention that James did give me some bottles when we visited. Not sure if beer bottles can be described as cute, but they have gone for 330ml ones that are short and stocky in keeping with the dwarf theme. And if you still need persuading what great guys they are, well just recently, upon the untimely death of singer Chris Cornell they announced they would brew a beer in his honour. The beer is named after the Soundgarden track By Crooked Steps and they will be donating money from the sale of the beer, which will be available in cask, keg and bottles, to CALM (Campaign Against Living Miserably) (https://www.thecalmzone.net/) , a charity devoted to preventing male suicide. As well as their hop and malt suppliers matching their donation, their bottle label and pump clip suppliers are donating their services as well which is great news.

So if you haven’t done so before, now is the time to partake of the epic tales and raise a glass to the Dwarfen brother and sisterhood.

Website –  http://fownesbrewing.co.uk/ and follow them on Twitter & Facebook

 

 

 

 

Brum Beer Profiles – Rock & Roll Brewhouse

The Jewellery Quarter is rapidly becoming a must visit venue for the drinkers of Birmingham, The Lord Clifden, The Rose Villa Tavern & The Church being joined by exciting new venues  like 1000 Trades, The Pig & Tail & the subject of our latest profile.  Upon hearing Nick Cave’s new album playing as Lynne met me at the Door of the Rock & Roll Brewhouse, I knew I was going to like this place.  Dave joined us a short time later and we got to know the people with such good musical taste.

The Rock & Roll Brewhouse can be found on Regents Place in The Jewellery Quarter where we found proprietors Mark & Lynne.  Mark has long experience of brewing, starting as a home brewer and then getting involved with the Rock and Roll Brewery when it was based at the Lamp Tavern in Barford St and the Bluebell Cider house in Hockley Heath.

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Lynn used to write the “Lynn’s Letters” column in the Birmingham CAMRA magazine and met Mark when doing an interview with him for the magazine.  They soon discovered they had a shared interest in music as well as beer, and when the need arose for Lynn to get a bit of brewery work experience she turned to Mark.  The initial impetus had been the possibility of working in a pub on the Derbyshire/Leicestershire border, but circumstance made this a bit difficult, so instead she concentrated on dividing her time between her shifts at the Post Office Vaults bar in Birmingham city centre and the brewery and being Birmingham’s only female brewer.

After a while the brewery job won out, and although there was a limit on what they could brew at the pub the enjoyment outweighed that.  Recently however, the chance came to move the brewery to its own premises and within 10 minutes of viewing the current location Mark knew it would be OK, despite its quirkiness.  The pair got the keys on 1st Feb and have worked hard to create the space they wanted.  At the time it was 6 different units with a couple of long corridors, and photography studios with band rehearsal rooms taking up the space, but after a lot of hard work it has now become a working brewery and tap room.

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It has a 6 barrel kit plus a smaller pilot kit and they now have no constraints over what they can brew, which they are really enjoying, and are revelling in having control of their own product.  When we visited, they were brewing a green hop beer using hops from Mark’s garden, when a musician they had been chatting to at the Moseley Folk Festival turned up with a big bag of mulberries, which they popped into the brew because…well, why not.  One particularly impressive elements of their rebuild is their focus on sustainability, with much of the material from building being reused to create cladding and insulation for the brewery equipment.  This focus on sustainability, is fundamental to Mark & Lynne, echoed across all their practices and they have no desire to grow, as they believe small is beautiful.

When Mark came up with the name Rock and Roll Brewhouse, as well as tying into his passion for music, it enabled them to theme the beer names around songs, bands and puns, which we found quite cool…who wouldn’t want to try a glass of Brew Springsteen.  In the spirit of keeping things local they are getting their pump clips done by a manufacturer in the JQ.

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We asked Mark & Lynne what help they had received from the local organisations and were pleased to hear JQ Development Team had offered support and encouragement, as well as a community to be part of.  This has taken the form of including them in the JQDT weekend and building community through litter picks Mark & Lynne have been getting involved in.    This left me wondering what would happen if this kind of support was available for the city centre.

Besides being available at the Brewhouse on a Friday evening, and, from October, the first Saturday of the month, their vegan beers can be found at the Lamp Tavern, the Bluebell, and various local beer festivals.

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The decor of the bar revolves around the music theme with nods to the musical history of Birmingham in the shape of framed gig tickets and posters, shelves and a ceiling of 7” singles and the “beer garden” part of which featured, rather appropriately,  Nick’s Cave.  I don’t know if it is the place or the people but it wasn’t long before we moved off the subject of beer and onto a discussion music over a bottle of Bramble On, which I have to say was very nice.

Brum Beer Profiles – Clink

‘All our dreams can come true, if we have the courage to pursue them’

Walt Disney

 ‘Have you seen that Tweet? Who are Clink?’

A movement or scene is often started by dreamers, people with an idea and a passion, and the courage to try to make them come true.  Others may follow suit, each with their own dreams, and the courage to pursue them.

Now in Birmingham, like most cities we suppose, there is a low-level swirl of rumours around the beer scene over who is doing what; most famous or maybe infamous, being that of Birmingham Tap, (similar to Euston Tap) is going to open soon…for the last 2-3 years. So in mid-July a tweet declared that ‘Clink’, a new bottle shop and tap-room, would be opening at The Custard Factory in Digbeth.  We had people getting in touch with us asking if we knew who was behind it, the short answer being, not a clue. Out of nowhere a new venue was opening a few minutes’ walk from the Bullring.  To quote Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid “Who are those guys?”  So one wet Monday evening we went along to find out…

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Our first question was who are these courageous souls, who are brave enough to pursue their dreams? The guys in question are Richard Sadler (no relation to the Black Country brewers of the same name), James Beckett, and David Purcell; 3 colleagues who work together at Fazeley Studios and spent time together drinking in the bars of Birmingham.

We met with Richard and James to learn more.

Dave – So how did you get into beer?

Richard: I’ve been interested in beer since I was old enough to drink.  About three years ago I got turned on to craft beer thanks to Brewdog and cold fresh Punk IPA.  I had always liked beer but when I tried that, it was on another level, and I started thinking, where can I get more? As I got more and more in to it I become more passionate.

James: I became a more selective drinker, after growing up drinking lager,  thanks to a family friend that started Northern Monk in Leeds. They have also proved helpful in providing advice once we’d decided to open our bar.

David: I grew up in Hereford and was a real ale drinker from the start, especially Wye Valley as they were local.  I even had a few of the seasonal specials with a nettle beer being one that still lives large in the memory.  My epiphany beer was Steph Weiss by And Union in Munich which in a roundabout way led me to discover Cotteridge Wines and their huge selection of beers…

Dream Becomes Reality

We asked the guys how Clink went from dream to reality, and the answer was beautiful in is simplicity;

While working together we were all just batting the idea around jokingly really, and it just spiralled out of control.  And we went into it head first.  It all happened really quickly.

They had discussed their passion for beer, including their admiration for places like Cotteridge Wines, and dreamt of opening their own space, when one of them said, ‘Lets do it’.

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They have received advice and help from various parts of the industry:

Other bottle shops, breweries, people who fit bars, nearly everyone was really welcoming.

With the likes of Cotteridge Wines offering encouragement:

Yeah they’re my beer heroes.  I was really nervous at first because I thought they might be annoyed about us doing it.  Jaz messaged us on Twitter and said ‘I’m going to come down’ adding to my nerves but when he come down he was so nice and friendly.  We are lucky that we have been able to build a good relationship with them.

The guys set about making enquirers at a number of different venues, but working in Digbeth the Custard Factory seemed like an obvious choice, and so close to where they all still work.

The Custard Factory have been supportive, with their Twitter account being most people’s first inkling that Clink was happening.

The reality into action

Clink is a bottle shop, boasting a fantastic selection of bottles, from some of the best breweries from the UK, Europe and the USA, along with eight taps with the ability to buy, and fill growlers.

We just wanted great beer, beer we would like.  We get the beers direct from breweries where we can.

The guys have become the first Birmingham Venue to take on Untappd Verified Venue Status

We are just trying it out.  We all use Untappd ourselves and liked the way you could put your  whole beer menu online, we have had quite a few people pop by because they have seen we have put a beer on.  We wondered  if it would be worth it and it seems to have been so far.

Who is their customer base in Digbeth?  When we meet them it was perhaps a little too early to get a clear sense of their average…well anything really.

We have literally no demographic, all ages have been popping in so far. We have had some customers from surrounding businesses, including one place that has a beer fridge in their office, and another that buys beer for their employees on a Friday. We think it is great that such a diverse group of people are into good beer.

When we spoke to the guys they had only been open for a week or 2, and they were still figuring out a lot of stuff, but their passion and commitment will see them through. They are still trying to settle on set opening times, and learning when their busy times may be, but will always answer if you tweet them for information. They have been known to be flexible, with a focus on just enjoying engaging with customers, and staying open a little longer when busy.

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More Dreaming

Future plans for Clink include possible Meet the Brewer events and possible tap take overs, but the main focus is making a success of the shop, and enjoying making their dream a reality.

Perhaps in the future we could look at opening something else, perhaps open something on the Pershore Road, maybe a tap-room or something, with all the awesome places already there, Wildcat Tap, Stirchley WInes & Spirits, Cotteridge Wines, The British Oak. It could become a bit of a beer mile.

Whatever the future plans we are chuffed to see these guys having the courage to pursue their dreams and hope others will look at the actions they have taken and also choose to follow their own dreams.

We are excited to see the progression of this great little venue, and look forward to popping back to chat to the lads when they are fully settled in.

Are you considering starting to brew?  Want to open a bottle shop? Or Bar?  Do you want to add to the scene/movement here in Birmingham and the surrounding areas?

Well listen to Uncle Walt’s words and make it happen.

Birmingham Beer Bash Profiles -Twisted Barrel Ale

I have an admission to make, I am proud to be from Coventry, so Coventry’s own Twisted Barrel has a special place in my heart.  It has been great to see them grow and find some success, it also helps that they make fantastic beer.

In its short life as a brewery they have become arguably, the most well know microbrewery in the Midlands, so we wanted to know more about these guys and share with you why they are ‘More Folk than Punk’.   Twisted Barrel will be joining Sacre Brew (Find there Profile here), and Fixed Wheel (Find there Profile here) as one of the local breweries showcased at this year’s Birmingham Beer Bash and so become the third of our Birmingham Beer Bash Profile blogs.

The Folk

I sat down with four of the Twisted Barrel team, Bar Manager Jaime, Owner and Head Brewer Ritchie, Brewer Carl and a fourth man, who will remain unknown, a man of mystery if you will.  Many of the questions were answered by the team, unless I have specifically stated otherwise.

I asked for a bit of background about each of the team, and what got them into beer and led to them being part of Twisted Barrel.

Jamie – I look after front of house and help out around the brewery, racking bottling etc. I’ve known Ritchie for over 15 years.  I am part of a group of people who came together to create Twisted Barrel, before this I worked at Warwick University and as a game designer & web designer for some time.   My focus is looking after our customers in the tap room but also learning to brew.    I created Baltic Porter last year that was described as heavier than ketamine.   My next brew will be a Smoked Chilli Porter.  We like to be creative here, we are boarding the crazy train and you’re all invited to come with us.

My beer journey was largely due to Living in and around Earlsdon, there were a lot of places that sold interesting beers, things from Belgium and things like that.   I discovered beers like Saison Du Pont, and also as a Hunter.S.Thompson and Ralph Steadman fan I was drawn to the Flying Dog bottles.

Ritchie My previous career was as an accountant for 17 years or so.  I started Twisted Barrel with Chris and our partners Jenny and Annie in Chris’s garage back in July 2013 in Tile Hill Coventry.   We started home brewing and started Twisted Barrel to see if our beers would be commercially liked, not just liked by our friends, who we gave beers to for free.   We started as the smallest brewery (Pico Brewery)  in the country with only 120 bottles finding their way out into the world and we still worked full time.    We sought to improve our beers, learn new techniques and try different recipes before we took to the next step.  We stayed at that level for a year and then started to make expansion plans in July 2014.  I was able to give up my job in January 2015 to focus on the brewery and that’s what I do as my day job now.   I am the only employee along with Carl and I focus on the brewing and running the company on a day- to-day basis. 

I initially got into ale while in New Zealand due a brewery called Monteith, one of the first breweries I remember producing beer in 330ml bottles.  We would also spend evenings at The Craven (the one in Coventry) drinking Sarah Hughes Ruby Red Ale and talking about beer, which is really where the podcast came from (more on that later).

Carl I started home brewing about four or five years ago and was still working in the NHS.   I was bored and disgruntled and discovered I really liked beer I wanted to get involved.  I felt the best way to do that was to get a qualification so I went up to Sunderland to complete a course and began looking for jobs with breweries.   I quickly learnt there were no brewery jobs going.  A microbrewery opened up in Coventry, I applied and I got job as the Head Brewer, but I quickly realised it wasn’t really environment for me.  Coincidentally at the same time Twisted Barrel were looking for another brewer,  I’d been a fan of Twisted Barrel from the first month it started and they create the beers that I was kind of aiming for.   I started working here about 4 months ago.  

I originally got into cask ales and really enjoyed Hobgoblin.    I then went over to Oregon and had Rogue Dead Guy Ale and it was that good, I actually stole the glass from the brewery tap.   Whilst drinking the beer I realised that the name of beer was on the glass and wanted to remember it.   I spoke to the bar staff and left a tip.   About a year later I was looking at the glass and really wanted to find the beer again, but couldn’t find it anywhere in the UK or nearby.  I eventually got in contact with Cotteridge Wines and my love of beer progressed from there.

The genesis of Twisted Barrel can be found in Ritchie and Chris’s Podcast history.  I wanted to know more, and learn how the podcast led to starting the brewery.

What led you to starting the Podcast?

General beer geekery really.   You get to that point in life where you almost need an excuse to get together around someone’s house and have a drink.   So we called it a podcast.   It was just a way to share our love of beer with the world and talk about something that we cared about.   Something creative to focus on, something we really cared about instead of our day job.  We just want to have fun and have a bit of a laugh.  

We got in to home brewing to be more knowledgeable for a podcast and then realised we liked home brewing so much we ended up not doing podcasting anymore – it all escalated from there.

And we are very glad it did escalate.  The podcast can still be found at All Hail the Ale! and on iTunes.

Press Start

I originally encountered Twisted Barrel while visiting the Earlsdon Festival, when Chris and Ritchie were offering tastings outside of Beer Gonzo.  I liked what I had and was fascinated as they were the only Coventry Brewery I was aware of at that time.  I had been able to get hold of some of their bottles from Beer Gonzo and had some interaction with the guys via Twitter and Untapped and had continued to be very impressed.   So when I heard they were looking to develop and grow by opening a brewery and tap room in Fargo Village, I was really excited.  It is perhaps typical of Twisted Barrel that this came about collaboratively and had a community of people involved.

I had a lot of friends and family help with the setting up of the brewery both financially and practically, right down to the creation of the actual bar here in the Tap Room.   The whole process of setting up between March and June 2015 was stressful with the impending realisation of ‘oh crap I have to set up a big ass brewery’.   But the opening day was so lovely, and the turnout on launch day was just stunning.  There was a queue forming at 11:45am and as soon as we opened the door we began serving and didn’t stop until 7:10pm we were non-stop, serving for about 7 hours.   We realised we may have underestimated how many people would arrive and the response was overwhelming.  Overtime, we have built up a really good hardcore group of regulars and lots of people dropping in to check the place out.

 We’ve had great support since launch and we continue to develop and grow.   We have continued to explore what we can do with the space including events and brewery tours.  The people of Coventry support us that much, that we almost became a bar  instead of a brewery ,  and quite by accident we became the third best venue in Coventry – as voted  by the local paper.   About 6 months ago we did have to reassess how to enable us to focus on external sales, and find a way to take me (Ritchie) away from the bar.  I was doing 16 hour days, brewing during the day and then working in the tap in the evening.   Some of the other partners have been able to help out and we brought in Carl.

During our conversations for the blog we have been heartened to hear that many of the beer people and businesses in the Midlands have supported each other, Twisted Barrel have been no different.

In terms of venues there been supportive from day one, Stirchley Wines, Beer Gonzo and Inspire in Coventry. Cherry Reds has been fantastic supporter from day one.   Cotteridge Wines have also been very supportive.  

Their beers can now also be found at eebria.com, and are sold in 1000 Trades and Pig & Tail to name a few.

More Folk than Punk

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The team at Twisted Barrel have developed a clear identity for the brewery, one that reflects the personalities of the people behind it.  This is encapsulated in their moto ‘More Folk than Punk’.

One of the directors came up with that – we both looked at each other and said yeah that explains it and encapsulates us.   A little left leaning, like to work collaboratively, and work face-to-face with people.  

Punk has become more corporate nowadays and we’re not the kind of people that stand on a rooftop and shout about ourselves.  It feels like it fits with our family focused, collaborative approach.

This personality extends to the beers and their names, often named after sci-fi or fantasy (Wake-Up Juice refers to Back to the Future 3), and the events held at the brewery (Father Ted day & Game of Thrones Day to name a few).  I personally believe the success of the Tap Room is largely due to the welcoming and family centred atmosphere they have developed.

Twisted Barrel – To be Continued…

Twisted Barrel is a brewery starting to gain fans nationally.  They have been featured in Flavourly Beer Boxes, hosted #craftbeerhour and been interviewed on the Beer O’clock Show.  They have grown exponentially, and we wanted to know what comes next:

Now it’s a case of getting some national distribution going.  Over the last three months especially we’ve had a lot of more interest.  I think some people think we’re a bigger brewery than we are and people don’t realise we only really have two employees.

We will continue to make good beer.  We hope to continue to develop our company profile and build on the increased interest we have had recently.  We also hope to continue to find new routes to market.

The group of directors are looking at focusing on developing new venues and Birmingham is very much on our radar.  We don’t intend to be a national player, like Beavertown and breweries like that.  We hope to be a leader in the regional area and we want to maintain our interaction, face-to-face with our customers, ensuring we maintain our connection to people.

I had a great time chatting with the team, with a lot of laughs.  We discussed a lot more but this blog is already long enough.  They are a passionate bunch, who care about making a great product, but will not compromise on their principles.

If you would like to know more about Twisted Barrel and where you can find their beers contact them via Twitter, Facebook and on their website.

Birmingham Beer Bash Profiles – Sacre Brew

10565258_540279709442034_7800467266853589680_nIntroduction

As a lead up to this year’s Birmingham Beer Bash and the inaugural Birmingham Beer Week we, of the Collective, thought it would be nice to have a chat with the 3 West Midlands brewers that are going to be at the Beer Bash.

The Life of Gwen

Our second profile is with Gwen Sanchirico of Sacre Brew, in Wolverhampton, who told us her rambling (her words) story of how a woman from over there (USA) ended up brewing over here. As usual we discussed her formative drinking years which, since her parents are Argentinian, involved wine rather than beer, and when she did start drinking the latter at college in New York, the choice apparently wasn’t great.

Did you start off drinking Bud and Miller?

My parents are from Argentina so I was allowed to drink wine growing up, diluted of course. So I really wasn’t interested in beer until I went to college. I hadn’t really tried beer much before then. I came to the UK in 1984, when I was 16, and had beer here.

Refining a Palate

She quickly made the distinction between good beer and crap beer, and as the burgeoning US craft beer scene began to grow, was able to begin drinking a few more unusual beers. She reckons her first epiphany beer, as we like to call them, was a Witbier from a small US brewery that no longer exists, and then Midas Touch from Dogfish Head.

I went to University and did a lot of beer drinking there. Well, I wasn’t a big drinker as most of the beer then was shit and even early I realised I had a refined palate – well, identified good beer from the bad.

 To put things in context I went to University in 1985 and the craft beer/microbrewery revolution had started in the US in the 1970s when President Carter legalised home-brewing; his brother was a big fan of beer. What happened was a lot of people started home brewing and they realised their home-brew was much better than the crap they could get in the stores, so many went into business as micro-brewers, and people responded because there was more variety. The entire beer culture that had accumulated via immigration into the US was wiped out by Prohibition. So by 1979 nobody had a clue, unless you travelled to a place with a big beer culture.

 Was there an ‘Epiphany’ beer?

Nothing really blew my mind away at college, but sometime later – there was beer called W!t. It was a witbier, but not a typical witbier, as it was Americanised, and a little different. It was really easy drinking and had lots of interesting flavours. What really made me crazy, in a good way, was Dogfish Head Midas Touch. I tried that and it’s like a wine or brandy, not really beery, just this amazing combination of flavours and textures. Dogfish Head worked with this molecular archaeologist, who would analyse residues inside pottery at ancient grave sites and archaeological sites. They would test it and they identify what the crud on the pottery was. There was a site in Turkey and they analysed the pottery used to store a liquid back then. They used that and a bit of artistic licence and produced a beer called Midas Touch. It had raisins, honey, grape must, some type of grain, and malted barley. Dogfish Head created a series of beers reconstructed from archaeological sites thousands of years old to show, fun, but to also show beer has been around before agriculture, and in every culture. So it’s an important beverage. Midas Touch really resonated with me. It’s more like a Barley Wine character, but actually some ancient and weird thing.

 Sacre Home Brew

Both beers opened up a world of possibilities and when she started home brewing in the 90s it led to some experimentation i.e. her first beer was a spruce beer.

In 1993 there was an article in the local magazine, while I was living in Manhattan. They interviewed owners of two home brew stores in Manhattan and there were saying ‘you buy a kit for this much, and in brewing you could do this, this, and this’ – the reporter broke down the cost per bottle etc. That really appealed to me. I like cooking and stuff. My boyfriend and I then bought a kit. The kit came with a book called ‘The Joy of Homebrewing’ by Charlie Papazian and he covered different styles. There was a lot of emphasis on British beer, different stuff, at least better than ‘Old Milwaukee.’

 I was very creative as a home-brewer and would make beer with vanilla and beetroot; spruce was my first beer, and I liked to experiment a lot.

75320c455c4c6bb61b5365470c1f4209_320x320Jumping the Pond

After moving around a lot including 6 years in Idaho she ended up back in New York and met her future husband at a gig in Brooklyn. After a couple of years of a long distance relationship it was decided that one of them would need to move and, to some of us, it seems Gwen drew the short straw and ended up in Wolverhampton in 2012.

So what brought you to England in the first place?

I married a man living in Wolverhampton. We met at a concert in Brooklyn. We did the long distance thing, but realised if we wanted the relationship to continue we would need to get married and one of us would need to move. It made more sense for me to move here. Even when being given the choice between New York City and Wolverhampton – the choice was obvious!

Her most recent job in the States had been as a project manager for a software development team but a similar job was hard to come by in the UK, so when Wolverhampton City Council announced a contest to find budding entrepreneurs, she thought she’d have a go. And after complaining about the state of some of the British beer she was drinking, her mother in law suggested she opened a brewery, and so Sacre Brew was born.

When you moved here did you know what you wanted to do? Did you consider brewing?

No, not really. I couldn’t get a job over here. I had the credentials, but people didn’t seem to… understand them. I was aware of a glut of project managers looking for work at the same time. Plus I’m an immigrant, and that’s always a disadvantage, as they assumed I would move back in a year etc.

 After a year I got sick of looking – and it was soul sucking looking for work. I hadn’t brought my kit with me and hadn’t brewed in a few years. There was a contest for entrepreneurs who wanted to start a business. Wolverhampton Council organised it. There was a financial reward for winning it. I filled out the form and was selected.

 They gave us training, including how to do a business plan and how to do financial forecasts etc. There were a series of workshops. There was a lot of mentoring with the financial stuff. I submitted an application as I was not working and my husband said ‘you have to do something.’ He agreed I shouldn’t work at Burger King, so that was cool. I assessed my skills and asked myself ‘what could I do here that would be of value and would like to do?’ 

 

I was at the pub with family and I had a beer and I was bitching about it like I usually did, and my mother-in-law said, ‘Why don’t you open your own brewery, join the competition, and see what you get?”

SacreBrew_Logo_trans500The Name Sacre Brew

She told us that she had played bass guitar for many years, including a project that just had 2 bassists which must’ve been interesting, but the brewery name came from her stage name in an earlier band, Gwen Sacre-Bleu.

I played bass guitar and played in bands and stuff, as often as I could. I started playing guitar when I was 13. In college somebody needed a bassist, so I bought a really cheap bass. My stage name was Gwen Sacre-Bleu, with this horrible band haVeblue. Each band member had ‘blue’ in their name. As my name is Sanchirico it has some of the same letters and sounds. When I was looking to open the brewery, looking to build a website, Twitter, things like that, I still didn’t have a name. It was the last thing I did. One of my friends suggested my old stage name, and another friend said, ‘How about Sacre Brew?’ and I loved it. A lot of people seem to like it, although a lot of people mistakenly call it Scare Brew.

A Home to Brew From

Her first 3 months brewing were on a small 20 litre kit in a local restaurant called the Hungry Bistro where she sold her beer, but after a 6-month search she found a place on an industrial estate in early 2014.

First I linked up with one of the Wolverhampton business competition winners, Richard Brown, who had opened a restaurant called Hungry Bistro, and makes nice affordable food. We had similar standards and philosophies about food and drink. He invited me to brew on his premises with my 20l pilot kit until I found some premises. The relationship was he would get to sell my beer in his restaurant and anything left over I could sell to others. I was glad to get stuff out there and start building a reputation. That was really helpful. It took a few months to find a permanent place. I really needed to make a pest of myself to get it. I moved in March 24th 2014.

With help from some local bottle shops stocking the beers as well, and a bit of crowd funding she was able to upgrade the equipment and her flagship beer, ‘Man on the Oss,’ was launched. This was a sessionable saison, whose name was inspired by hearing the locals of Wolverhampton arranging to meet by the statue of Prince Albert on horseback, but she told us a lot of the names have no meaning, and some of the weirder ones are done to mess with people’s heads i.e. who is Ocipio and where does this blood lust come from?

 

Crowd funding

Gwen’s history of fundraising was instrumental in setting up, as crowd funding played a major part in meeting the financial needs of setting up. This process also helped to build a sense of community around the brewery, something Gwen has been keen to continue to foster.

When I moved to Idaho I didn’t really know many people, so I got involved in the local Green Party. I did lots of issues-based activism, community organising, and campaigning on things that were important to me – mostly environmental and social justice stuff. I worked on 13 different campaigns for various offices from highway division commissioner to state senate, and did some fundraising for those campaigns. So I learned how to ask people for money.

 So when I wanted to set up this brewery, I had nothing, I never made a lot of money working, and what little I did have I blew on flying to UK to see my now-husband. All I really had was my pension, which was only made up of the money my employer contributed, so it wasn’t a lot.

 I realised I needed more money. Through the financial planning I had to do, I worked out what I needed to set up. I had seen Indiegogo campaigns for a number of things, including microbreweries. I researched crowed funding; I looked at what other microbreweries where doing and what incentives they were offering and decided I would give it a try. I had no other recourse. I didn’t really want any investors, because I didn’t really want people telling me what to do, especially when you have quite strong ideas of how you want to do something. 

 I raised more than £6,000 in 30 days and it was a really good experience – it was very humbling and it was incredible that people wanted to contribute. People were generous and people continue to be generous, as the brewery continues to receive donations now.

 It has been really helpful as the brewery had a few problems over time, last year – I needed a new bottler as I was still using a normal one like home-brewers use. I found a very basic but efficient bottler at a very reasonable cost. This time I decided not to go with Indiegogo and raise the money via my own website and social media.  I was able to raise it and that is where I met Alec (@MrTeaBelly) who has become one of my main volunteers in the brewery.

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Alec (@MrTeaBelly) hard at work in the brewery

A Brewer with a Community Focus

It’s clear from talking to Gwen she is a person who cares and believes in action. It is fantastic to see Sacre Brew is a business that is ran along the lines of her values and beliefs.

It strikes me that they’re doing the crowd funding and seeing how you interact with people and fans of the brewery it seems you have created a kind of community feel has that been something you have purposely tried to create.

Yeah, I have a manifesto how I think this business should be run, and community building is a part of it and giving back to it is important to me. I tried to do this in practical ways such as giving away some of my mistake beers to a local art gallery, and I am very generous with many of the customers that come to the brewery. 

 You know beer brings people together and I think a brewery should do it should too because that’s where the beer’s being made.

 I really like art and believe that art should be integrated into everyday life.  It stimulates and creates conversation, and I want people to be stimulated by my beer, including the name, the artwork, and beer itself. Some of the artwork on the bottles is from friends, but also local artists. I’m not able to pay them but I do try to give them lots of exposure, including space on my website, information on the bottle, and exposure via social media.

 I feel that a lot of your values and your attitudes are born out in your beers in the flavours in the style that you make.

I have a friend that does describe Sacre Brew as an extension of me so if you don’t like me, you’re probably not going to like my beers. I also run the brewery with my own values and philosophies.

 What next?

Gwen does not plan to stand still and has big plans for the future.

What is the future for Sacre Brew?

In the short-term I would also like more space in the brewery with more fermenters coming enabling me to increase production. Long term, my original plan was to open a Brew Pub, a space for people to come and drink my beer directly from the source and eat great food; the bar at the brewery is a bit of a trial run for a Brew Pub.  I would like to continue to engage with the community including using more local artists for the bottle labels.  I envisage my beers becoming sought after, exciting recipes that people travel to have therefore bringing people to Wolverhampton.   

Gwen, a woman who speaks her mind and lets her beers speak for themselves, and you can hear them both speak at Birmingham Beer Bash.

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Sacre Brew can be found at Unit 13, Monmore Road, Wolverhampton, WV1 2TZ, www.sacrebrew.com, @sacrebrew & www.facebook.com/sacrebrew. The tap room at the brewery is currently on hiatus but will be open most weekends again in August (see social media or contact Gwen for more info) and if you’d like to find out more, you’ll be able to meet Gwen at Birmingham Beer Bash and try some of her award-winning beers.