Tag: Beer Bash

Birmingham Beer Bash – Travelers Tales

We had a fantastic time at Birmingham Beer bash this year and were very pleased to have Lucy give us a write up about one of the fringe events Birmingham Beer Bash: Dea Latis Brewsters Brunch.

We have often said that a successful beer scene in Birmingham will bring people to the city from further afield.  The following are snippets and links to blogs from two such people who arrive in a pincer movement from North and South.

Martin Oates of Beer is the Answer made the journey up from down south with his Brother…

IMAG0161
Photo from Beer is The Answer 

Saturday 23rd July, went for a run, abandoned son to an afternoon with his grandparents (still not sure they “get” Pokémon Go though) and headed off to Birmingham with the youngest of my two brothers.

check out the rest of the wonderful write up at:

http://blogno1mjpo007.blogspot.co.uk/2016/08/birmingham-beer-bash-that-was-fun.html

And from the North Beers Manchester had a great time, despite a phone disaster.

wp-1469366030981
Photo from Beers Manchester

This was my first time. And, like most people know, for good or ill, you remember the first.

#EvilKegFilth only. And on a day like Friday, that was absolutely fine by me!

Red the rest of the blog here:

https://beersmanchester.wordpress.com/2016/07/24/birmingham-beer-bash-22072016/

David Martin brought together visitors from across the country:

For all its imperfections, Birmingham is often praised by newcomers for its friendliness and unpretentiousness – and there too lies the appeal of the Beer Bash.

I’m no fan of clubbiness, exclusivity or obsessions – I’m not a pressure group person – and the Bash smartly avoids all these pitfalls. My Saturday daytime party (each year bringing more people) was five dad’s, each bringing a twenty-something son/daughter, travelling in from London to Lancashire. And that says something – because the Bash is neither too fashionably self-conscious to put off us older ones, nor is it too earnest for the young ones. We just share an enthusiasm for good, interesting, innovative beer and food, and the banter that follows.


The beer range works for the adventurous and the cautious, the food is on-trend and high quality, and the venue works well (despite the wasteland walk from the station); the numbers attending keep it manageable from a service angle, but are enough to drive the atmosphere. You get the feel of an ‘event’, without the downsides of large scale or over-ambition.

CoETObXW8AArRmX


It’s unfair to name favourites, but Blackjack’s addition this year was a real plus, and those Patty Men nailed it again. Saturday afternoon’s musicians deserve a mention too.

Of course these things are never perfect – more seating for eating would help. But the event’s laid back sociability is its trademark, and that’s probably down to its unassuming origins. And that’s where the last word should go, to the team who created the Bash out of sheer enthusiasm and graft with – as far as I know – no prior history of organising big event. Long may they run.

You can also check out some photos from Francis Clarke of Open Up Digital here:-

https://www.flickr.com/photos/francisclarkephotography/sets/72157671436571876/

Photos by Francis Clarke is licensed by CC BY-NC-SA 4.0

and a short video from Slinky Productions here:-

We had a great time at the Bash and look forward to 2017.

 

 

Birmingham Beer Bash Profiles -Twisted Barrel Ale

I have an admission to make, I am proud to be from Coventry, so Coventry’s own Twisted Barrel has a special place in my heart.  It has been great to see them grow and find some success, it also helps that they make fantastic beer.

In its short life as a brewery they have become arguably, the most well know microbrewery in the Midlands, so we wanted to know more about these guys and share with you why they are ‘More Folk than Punk’.   Twisted Barrel will be joining Sacre Brew (Find there Profile here), and Fixed Wheel (Find there Profile here) as one of the local breweries showcased at this year’s Birmingham Beer Bash and so become the third of our Birmingham Beer Bash Profile blogs.

The Folk

I sat down with four of the Twisted Barrel team, Bar Manager Jaime, Owner and Head Brewer Ritchie, Brewer Carl and a fourth man, who will remain unknown, a man of mystery if you will.  Many of the questions were answered by the team, unless I have specifically stated otherwise.

I asked for a bit of background about each of the team, and what got them into beer and led to them being part of Twisted Barrel.

Jamie – I look after front of house and help out around the brewery, racking bottling etc. I’ve known Ritchie for over 15 years.  I am part of a group of people who came together to create Twisted Barrel, before this I worked at Warwick University and as a game designer & web designer for some time.   My focus is looking after our customers in the tap room but also learning to brew.    I created Baltic Porter last year that was described as heavier than ketamine.   My next brew will be a Smoked Chilli Porter.  We like to be creative here, we are boarding the crazy train and you’re all invited to come with us.

My beer journey was largely due to Living in and around Earlsdon, there were a lot of places that sold interesting beers, things from Belgium and things like that.   I discovered beers like Saison Du Pont, and also as a Hunter.S.Thompson and Ralph Steadman fan I was drawn to the Flying Dog bottles.

Ritchie My previous career was as an accountant for 17 years or so.  I started Twisted Barrel with Chris and our partners Jenny and Annie in Chris’s garage back in July 2013 in Tile Hill Coventry.   We started home brewing and started Twisted Barrel to see if our beers would be commercially liked, not just liked by our friends, who we gave beers to for free.   We started as the smallest brewery (Pico Brewery)  in the country with only 120 bottles finding their way out into the world and we still worked full time.    We sought to improve our beers, learn new techniques and try different recipes before we took to the next step.  We stayed at that level for a year and then started to make expansion plans in July 2014.  I was able to give up my job in January 2015 to focus on the brewery and that’s what I do as my day job now.   I am the only employee along with Carl and I focus on the brewing and running the company on a day- to-day basis. 

I initially got into ale while in New Zealand due a brewery called Monteith, one of the first breweries I remember producing beer in 330ml bottles.  We would also spend evenings at The Craven (the one in Coventry) drinking Sarah Hughes Ruby Red Ale and talking about beer, which is really where the podcast came from (more on that later).

Carl I started home brewing about four or five years ago and was still working in the NHS.   I was bored and disgruntled and discovered I really liked beer I wanted to get involved.  I felt the best way to do that was to get a qualification so I went up to Sunderland to complete a course and began looking for jobs with breweries.   I quickly learnt there were no brewery jobs going.  A microbrewery opened up in Coventry, I applied and I got job as the Head Brewer, but I quickly realised it wasn’t really environment for me.  Coincidentally at the same time Twisted Barrel were looking for another brewer,  I’d been a fan of Twisted Barrel from the first month it started and they create the beers that I was kind of aiming for.   I started working here about 4 months ago.  

I originally got into cask ales and really enjoyed Hobgoblin.    I then went over to Oregon and had Rogue Dead Guy Ale and it was that good, I actually stole the glass from the brewery tap.   Whilst drinking the beer I realised that the name of beer was on the glass and wanted to remember it.   I spoke to the bar staff and left a tip.   About a year later I was looking at the glass and really wanted to find the beer again, but couldn’t find it anywhere in the UK or nearby.  I eventually got in contact with Cotteridge Wines and my love of beer progressed from there.

The genesis of Twisted Barrel can be found in Ritchie and Chris’s Podcast history.  I wanted to know more, and learn how the podcast led to starting the brewery.

What led you to starting the Podcast?

General beer geekery really.   You get to that point in life where you almost need an excuse to get together around someone’s house and have a drink.   So we called it a podcast.   It was just a way to share our love of beer with the world and talk about something that we cared about.   Something creative to focus on, something we really cared about instead of our day job.  We just want to have fun and have a bit of a laugh.  

We got in to home brewing to be more knowledgeable for a podcast and then realised we liked home brewing so much we ended up not doing podcasting anymore – it all escalated from there.

And we are very glad it did escalate.  The podcast can still be found at All Hail the Ale! and on iTunes.

Press Start

I originally encountered Twisted Barrel while visiting the Earlsdon Festival, when Chris and Ritchie were offering tastings outside of Beer Gonzo.  I liked what I had and was fascinated as they were the only Coventry Brewery I was aware of at that time.  I had been able to get hold of some of their bottles from Beer Gonzo and had some interaction with the guys via Twitter and Untapped and had continued to be very impressed.   So when I heard they were looking to develop and grow by opening a brewery and tap room in Fargo Village, I was really excited.  It is perhaps typical of Twisted Barrel that this came about collaboratively and had a community of people involved.

I had a lot of friends and family help with the setting up of the brewery both financially and practically, right down to the creation of the actual bar here in the Tap Room.   The whole process of setting up between March and June 2015 was stressful with the impending realisation of ‘oh crap I have to set up a big ass brewery’.   But the opening day was so lovely, and the turnout on launch day was just stunning.  There was a queue forming at 11:45am and as soon as we opened the door we began serving and didn’t stop until 7:10pm we were non-stop, serving for about 7 hours.   We realised we may have underestimated how many people would arrive and the response was overwhelming.  Overtime, we have built up a really good hardcore group of regulars and lots of people dropping in to check the place out.

 We’ve had great support since launch and we continue to develop and grow.   We have continued to explore what we can do with the space including events and brewery tours.  The people of Coventry support us that much, that we almost became a bar  instead of a brewery ,  and quite by accident we became the third best venue in Coventry – as voted  by the local paper.   About 6 months ago we did have to reassess how to enable us to focus on external sales, and find a way to take me (Ritchie) away from the bar.  I was doing 16 hour days, brewing during the day and then working in the tap in the evening.   Some of the other partners have been able to help out and we brought in Carl.

During our conversations for the blog we have been heartened to hear that many of the beer people and businesses in the Midlands have supported each other, Twisted Barrel have been no different.

In terms of venues there been supportive from day one, Stirchley Wines, Beer Gonzo and Inspire in Coventry. Cherry Reds has been fantastic supporter from day one.   Cotteridge Wines have also been very supportive.  

Their beers can now also be found at eebria.com, and are sold in 1000 Trades and Pig & Tail to name a few.

More Folk than Punk

b080ffe6-be17-40b3-aa23-6aa49a9abf81a9abc1e1-b097-4a2c-9cbc-ebfe857f2b7a

The team at Twisted Barrel have developed a clear identity for the brewery, one that reflects the personalities of the people behind it.  This is encapsulated in their moto ‘More Folk than Punk’.

One of the directors came up with that – we both looked at each other and said yeah that explains it and encapsulates us.   A little left leaning, like to work collaboratively, and work face-to-face with people.  

Punk has become more corporate nowadays and we’re not the kind of people that stand on a rooftop and shout about ourselves.  It feels like it fits with our family focused, collaborative approach.

This personality extends to the beers and their names, often named after sci-fi or fantasy (Wake-Up Juice refers to Back to the Future 3), and the events held at the brewery (Father Ted day & Game of Thrones Day to name a few).  I personally believe the success of the Tap Room is largely due to the welcoming and family centred atmosphere they have developed.

Twisted Barrel – To be Continued…

Twisted Barrel is a brewery starting to gain fans nationally.  They have been featured in Flavourly Beer Boxes, hosted #craftbeerhour and been interviewed on the Beer O’clock Show.  They have grown exponentially, and we wanted to know what comes next:

Now it’s a case of getting some national distribution going.  Over the last three months especially we’ve had a lot of more interest.  I think some people think we’re a bigger brewery than we are and people don’t realise we only really have two employees.

We will continue to make good beer.  We hope to continue to develop our company profile and build on the increased interest we have had recently.  We also hope to continue to find new routes to market.

The group of directors are looking at focusing on developing new venues and Birmingham is very much on our radar.  We don’t intend to be a national player, like Beavertown and breweries like that.  We hope to be a leader in the regional area and we want to maintain our interaction, face-to-face with our customers, ensuring we maintain our connection to people.

I had a great time chatting with the team, with a lot of laughs.  We discussed a lot more but this blog is already long enough.  They are a passionate bunch, who care about making a great product, but will not compromise on their principles.

If you would like to know more about Twisted Barrel and where you can find their beers contact them via Twitter, Facebook and on their website.

Birmingham Beer Bash Profiles – Sacre Brew

10565258_540279709442034_7800467266853589680_nIntroduction

As a lead up to this year’s Birmingham Beer Bash and the inaugural Birmingham Beer Week we, of the Collective, thought it would be nice to have a chat with the 3 West Midlands brewers that are going to be at the Beer Bash.

The Life of Gwen

Our second profile is with Gwen Sanchirico of Sacre Brew, in Wolverhampton, who told us her rambling (her words) story of how a woman from over there (USA) ended up brewing over here. As usual we discussed her formative drinking years which, since her parents are Argentinian, involved wine rather than beer, and when she did start drinking the latter at college in New York, the choice apparently wasn’t great.

Did you start off drinking Bud and Miller?

My parents are from Argentina so I was allowed to drink wine growing up, diluted of course. So I really wasn’t interested in beer until I went to college. I hadn’t really tried beer much before then. I came to the UK in 1984, when I was 16, and had beer here.

Refining a Palate

She quickly made the distinction between good beer and crap beer, and as the burgeoning US craft beer scene began to grow, was able to begin drinking a few more unusual beers. She reckons her first epiphany beer, as we like to call them, was a Witbier from a small US brewery that no longer exists, and then Midas Touch from Dogfish Head.

I went to University and did a lot of beer drinking there. Well, I wasn’t a big drinker as most of the beer then was shit and even early I realised I had a refined palate – well, identified good beer from the bad.

 To put things in context I went to University in 1985 and the craft beer/microbrewery revolution had started in the US in the 1970s when President Carter legalised home-brewing; his brother was a big fan of beer. What happened was a lot of people started home brewing and they realised their home-brew was much better than the crap they could get in the stores, so many went into business as micro-brewers, and people responded because there was more variety. The entire beer culture that had accumulated via immigration into the US was wiped out by Prohibition. So by 1979 nobody had a clue, unless you travelled to a place with a big beer culture.

 Was there an ‘Epiphany’ beer?

Nothing really blew my mind away at college, but sometime later – there was beer called W!t. It was a witbier, but not a typical witbier, as it was Americanised, and a little different. It was really easy drinking and had lots of interesting flavours. What really made me crazy, in a good way, was Dogfish Head Midas Touch. I tried that and it’s like a wine or brandy, not really beery, just this amazing combination of flavours and textures. Dogfish Head worked with this molecular archaeologist, who would analyse residues inside pottery at ancient grave sites and archaeological sites. They would test it and they identify what the crud on the pottery was. There was a site in Turkey and they analysed the pottery used to store a liquid back then. They used that and a bit of artistic licence and produced a beer called Midas Touch. It had raisins, honey, grape must, some type of grain, and malted barley. Dogfish Head created a series of beers reconstructed from archaeological sites thousands of years old to show, fun, but to also show beer has been around before agriculture, and in every culture. So it’s an important beverage. Midas Touch really resonated with me. It’s more like a Barley Wine character, but actually some ancient and weird thing.

 Sacre Home Brew

Both beers opened up a world of possibilities and when she started home brewing in the 90s it led to some experimentation i.e. her first beer was a spruce beer.

In 1993 there was an article in the local magazine, while I was living in Manhattan. They interviewed owners of two home brew stores in Manhattan and there were saying ‘you buy a kit for this much, and in brewing you could do this, this, and this’ – the reporter broke down the cost per bottle etc. That really appealed to me. I like cooking and stuff. My boyfriend and I then bought a kit. The kit came with a book called ‘The Joy of Homebrewing’ by Charlie Papazian and he covered different styles. There was a lot of emphasis on British beer, different stuff, at least better than ‘Old Milwaukee.’

 I was very creative as a home-brewer and would make beer with vanilla and beetroot; spruce was my first beer, and I liked to experiment a lot.

75320c455c4c6bb61b5365470c1f4209_320x320Jumping the Pond

After moving around a lot including 6 years in Idaho she ended up back in New York and met her future husband at a gig in Brooklyn. After a couple of years of a long distance relationship it was decided that one of them would need to move and, to some of us, it seems Gwen drew the short straw and ended up in Wolverhampton in 2012.

So what brought you to England in the first place?

I married a man living in Wolverhampton. We met at a concert in Brooklyn. We did the long distance thing, but realised if we wanted the relationship to continue we would need to get married and one of us would need to move. It made more sense for me to move here. Even when being given the choice between New York City and Wolverhampton – the choice was obvious!

Her most recent job in the States had been as a project manager for a software development team but a similar job was hard to come by in the UK, so when Wolverhampton City Council announced a contest to find budding entrepreneurs, she thought she’d have a go. And after complaining about the state of some of the British beer she was drinking, her mother in law suggested she opened a brewery, and so Sacre Brew was born.

When you moved here did you know what you wanted to do? Did you consider brewing?

No, not really. I couldn’t get a job over here. I had the credentials, but people didn’t seem to… understand them. I was aware of a glut of project managers looking for work at the same time. Plus I’m an immigrant, and that’s always a disadvantage, as they assumed I would move back in a year etc.

 After a year I got sick of looking – and it was soul sucking looking for work. I hadn’t brought my kit with me and hadn’t brewed in a few years. There was a contest for entrepreneurs who wanted to start a business. Wolverhampton Council organised it. There was a financial reward for winning it. I filled out the form and was selected.

 They gave us training, including how to do a business plan and how to do financial forecasts etc. There were a series of workshops. There was a lot of mentoring with the financial stuff. I submitted an application as I was not working and my husband said ‘you have to do something.’ He agreed I shouldn’t work at Burger King, so that was cool. I assessed my skills and asked myself ‘what could I do here that would be of value and would like to do?’ 

 

I was at the pub with family and I had a beer and I was bitching about it like I usually did, and my mother-in-law said, ‘Why don’t you open your own brewery, join the competition, and see what you get?”

SacreBrew_Logo_trans500The Name Sacre Brew

She told us that she had played bass guitar for many years, including a project that just had 2 bassists which must’ve been interesting, but the brewery name came from her stage name in an earlier band, Gwen Sacre-Bleu.

I played bass guitar and played in bands and stuff, as often as I could. I started playing guitar when I was 13. In college somebody needed a bassist, so I bought a really cheap bass. My stage name was Gwen Sacre-Bleu, with this horrible band haVeblue. Each band member had ‘blue’ in their name. As my name is Sanchirico it has some of the same letters and sounds. When I was looking to open the brewery, looking to build a website, Twitter, things like that, I still didn’t have a name. It was the last thing I did. One of my friends suggested my old stage name, and another friend said, ‘How about Sacre Brew?’ and I loved it. A lot of people seem to like it, although a lot of people mistakenly call it Scare Brew.

A Home to Brew From

Her first 3 months brewing were on a small 20 litre kit in a local restaurant called the Hungry Bistro where she sold her beer, but after a 6-month search she found a place on an industrial estate in early 2014.

First I linked up with one of the Wolverhampton business competition winners, Richard Brown, who had opened a restaurant called Hungry Bistro, and makes nice affordable food. We had similar standards and philosophies about food and drink. He invited me to brew on his premises with my 20l pilot kit until I found some premises. The relationship was he would get to sell my beer in his restaurant and anything left over I could sell to others. I was glad to get stuff out there and start building a reputation. That was really helpful. It took a few months to find a permanent place. I really needed to make a pest of myself to get it. I moved in March 24th 2014.

With help from some local bottle shops stocking the beers as well, and a bit of crowd funding she was able to upgrade the equipment and her flagship beer, ‘Man on the Oss,’ was launched. This was a sessionable saison, whose name was inspired by hearing the locals of Wolverhampton arranging to meet by the statue of Prince Albert on horseback, but she told us a lot of the names have no meaning, and some of the weirder ones are done to mess with people’s heads i.e. who is Ocipio and where does this blood lust come from?

 

Crowd funding

Gwen’s history of fundraising was instrumental in setting up, as crowd funding played a major part in meeting the financial needs of setting up. This process also helped to build a sense of community around the brewery, something Gwen has been keen to continue to foster.

When I moved to Idaho I didn’t really know many people, so I got involved in the local Green Party. I did lots of issues-based activism, community organising, and campaigning on things that were important to me – mostly environmental and social justice stuff. I worked on 13 different campaigns for various offices from highway division commissioner to state senate, and did some fundraising for those campaigns. So I learned how to ask people for money.

 So when I wanted to set up this brewery, I had nothing, I never made a lot of money working, and what little I did have I blew on flying to UK to see my now-husband. All I really had was my pension, which was only made up of the money my employer contributed, so it wasn’t a lot.

 I realised I needed more money. Through the financial planning I had to do, I worked out what I needed to set up. I had seen Indiegogo campaigns for a number of things, including microbreweries. I researched crowed funding; I looked at what other microbreweries where doing and what incentives they were offering and decided I would give it a try. I had no other recourse. I didn’t really want any investors, because I didn’t really want people telling me what to do, especially when you have quite strong ideas of how you want to do something. 

 I raised more than £6,000 in 30 days and it was a really good experience – it was very humbling and it was incredible that people wanted to contribute. People were generous and people continue to be generous, as the brewery continues to receive donations now.

 It has been really helpful as the brewery had a few problems over time, last year – I needed a new bottler as I was still using a normal one like home-brewers use. I found a very basic but efficient bottler at a very reasonable cost. This time I decided not to go with Indiegogo and raise the money via my own website and social media.  I was able to raise it and that is where I met Alec (@MrTeaBelly) who has become one of my main volunteers in the brewery.

CBG6WAkWQAAPNQ7
Alec (@MrTeaBelly) hard at work in the brewery

A Brewer with a Community Focus

It’s clear from talking to Gwen she is a person who cares and believes in action. It is fantastic to see Sacre Brew is a business that is ran along the lines of her values and beliefs.

It strikes me that they’re doing the crowd funding and seeing how you interact with people and fans of the brewery it seems you have created a kind of community feel has that been something you have purposely tried to create.

Yeah, I have a manifesto how I think this business should be run, and community building is a part of it and giving back to it is important to me. I tried to do this in practical ways such as giving away some of my mistake beers to a local art gallery, and I am very generous with many of the customers that come to the brewery. 

 You know beer brings people together and I think a brewery should do it should too because that’s where the beer’s being made.

 I really like art and believe that art should be integrated into everyday life.  It stimulates and creates conversation, and I want people to be stimulated by my beer, including the name, the artwork, and beer itself. Some of the artwork on the bottles is from friends, but also local artists. I’m not able to pay them but I do try to give them lots of exposure, including space on my website, information on the bottle, and exposure via social media.

 I feel that a lot of your values and your attitudes are born out in your beers in the flavours in the style that you make.

I have a friend that does describe Sacre Brew as an extension of me so if you don’t like me, you’re probably not going to like my beers. I also run the brewery with my own values and philosophies.

 What next?

Gwen does not plan to stand still and has big plans for the future.

What is the future for Sacre Brew?

In the short-term I would also like more space in the brewery with more fermenters coming enabling me to increase production. Long term, my original plan was to open a Brew Pub, a space for people to come and drink my beer directly from the source and eat great food; the bar at the brewery is a bit of a trial run for a Brew Pub.  I would like to continue to engage with the community including using more local artists for the bottle labels.  I envisage my beers becoming sought after, exciting recipes that people travel to have therefore bringing people to Wolverhampton.   

Gwen, a woman who speaks her mind and lets her beers speak for themselves, and you can hear them both speak at Birmingham Beer Bash.

sign-599x400

Sacre Brew can be found at Unit 13, Monmore Road, Wolverhampton, WV1 2TZ, www.sacrebrew.com, @sacrebrew & www.facebook.com/sacrebrew. The tap room at the brewery is currently on hiatus but will be open most weekends again in August (see social media or contact Gwen for more info) and if you’d like to find out more, you’ll be able to meet Gwen at Birmingham Beer Bash and try some of her award-winning beers.

Birmingham Beer Bash Profiles – Fixed Wheel Brewery

As part of the lead up to this year’s Birmingham Beer Bash (check out full details here www.birminghambeerbash.co.uk we thought we’d do a feature on each of the Midlands brewers that are appearing there, and so to that end I got up what to me was quite early and jumped on a train to Rowley Regis to visit Scott Povey at Fixed Wheel Brewery.

As was P1000165to be expected Scott was already there finishing off putting the malt into the mash tun, but more on that later, first a bit of history. Scott was born in South Birmingham but has been living in the Black Country for about 15 years. He remembers his early beer drinking as mainly revolving around keg in the form of Caffreys and Guinness, but he did always like dark beers such as Dorothy Goodbody’s Wholesome Stout. His real education was twofold, firstly in that a big influence was a workmate when he worked at Vauxhall who was a member of Redditch and Bromsgrove CAMRA who introduced him to a more varied selection of ales. P1000181And the second influence came from his concurrent interest in cycling when the club he was in would do an off season trip to Gent in Belgium during November with it’s 200+ cafes and bars. Although a while back, particular favourites that stood out were Het Waterhuis aan de Bierkant and Dulle Griet, the latter bringing back memories of fun nights trying to negotiate the steep stairs to the rest room wearing only one shoe 🙂 By this time he realised he liked to try different styles of beer, but doing time trials he missed out on the social aspect and would often only drink on a Sunday, so his love of cooking took him on to the idea of doing some home brewing around 2004/05.  He started with kits but soon moved on to building his own setup, and even now still uses his original mash tun for test brews. Over time he cut back on the cycling, but not before setting 2 British records for 50 and 100 mile time trials, and as the home brewing got serious he began to think about opening his own brewery.

Having visited a few breweries he was pleased when he saw news of Green Duck @greenduckbrew opening in Stourbridge with its glass partition so you could see where the beer was coming from. After a few visits he began chatting to Alan Preece, gave him some of his homebrews to try and by mid 2014 he had taken over as their brewer. He was able to give a few tweaks to their core beers whilst learning on the job and improving their consistency, and the brewing process as well as the quality. Later that same year he also opened up his own brewery, an 8 barrel system, on Long Lane trading estate, taking its name, Fixed Wheel, from his cycling past, and with a neat bicycle gear logo designed by Chris from Expressive Design in Tysley.

In September his first core beer, Blackheath Stout was launched, and the range was soon joined by Chain Reaction Pale aAe, No Brakes IPA, and, aP1000174 (2) little later, Century Gold, plus many others that have become favourites with the Midlands drinkers such as his range of single hop beers, called Single Speed, the Omerta Russian Imperial Stout, and, a particular favourite of mine, his recent Belgian IPA – Spartacus. And let’s not forget his collaboration with Angel Ales, Cyclone, a 15% triple IPA which I remember being quite a hit at the 2015 Birmingham Beer Bash, and speaking of which…

If I’m going to interview Scott I should do it on a brew day was my line of thinking, and since it’s the lead up to the Beer Bash it would be nice if it was going to be available there, so when Scott said he was brewing a Double IPA I jumped at the chance. So that was what he was on the opening stages of when I first arrived one dull Wednesday morning. He told me he was mashing in at 64℃, which was a bit less than his normal 66 or 67, with the recipe using 20kg of hops in total, 15 in the kettle and 5 for dry hopping (as a comparison P1000175No Brakes used 13 in total). One of the hops was Simcoe which Scott was using for the first time, and I had the task of breaking the vacuum packs up which was tons of fun and resulted in very sticky and aromatic hands. It was great to watch Scott as he checked and rechecked the temperature and Ph measurements- he is ridiculously thorough which is something that I, as a homebrewer, could learn from, but it paid off as he hit his pre-boil and fermenter og readings. We had a little taste and its promising, good colour and nice creamy, slightly oily/resinous mouthfeel.

Whilst there I also had a little chat with Harriet Bryant, the daughter of Sharon who is Scott’s business partner, chief taster and, sometimes, his biggest critic. She has the fun job of helping to bottle and then label said bottles which at the moment is all done by hand. P1000171 (2)She also helps on a Saturday when the brewhouse is open to the public serving Scott’s beers on both cask and keg. I asked if she’s always liked beer and she said she was a fan of wheat beers but since working at the brewery she has a greater appreciation of beer and likes all styles now. The bar itself gets a wide range of customers, young and old, male and female with many returnees but also lots of new faces, and they both emphasised how much they enjoyed and appreciated the community understanding and spirit that the place provides. Also keeping it in the family so to speak is the fact that a lot of the designs for the labels and pump clips is done by Harriet’s partner Ben Rolls of the Falling Leaf Tattoo Studio in Great Barr, along with Rachid Taibi aka The Upright One (find his blog on the importance of graphics and design in the beer industry here).

In the near future, as well as the release of the Ride It Like You Stole It DIPA and appearance at the Birmingham Beer Bash, there will be a beer from a recent collaboration with Clouded Minds and the Dudley Beer Festival as part of the Black Country month celebrations. And further ahead there’s a new wheat beer to be brewed, a collaboration with the Brewdog bar in Birmingham, and a 4th fermenting vessel so we’ll be able to sample more of these great beers.

In the end Scott said it is all about drink-ability, and, most importantly, balance…and let’s face it that’s pretty useful when riding a bike as well.