People in Glasshouses….Glasshouse Brewing Co

On Friday 8th September Josh Hughes pretty much completed the ‘circle of beer’ (apologies Lion King fans) when he hosted a tap takeover and meet the brewer for his own brewery, Glasshouse Brewing Co, where his beer journey started in Brewdog Birmingham.

I managed to grab the newest brewer on the block and ask him some questions about where he’s come from, where he is now and where he’s headed. Here’s what I learnt…

I started out by asking Josh how it had all started and he told me he’d joined the Brewdog team in June 2012 and worked at the bar for four and a half years. During that time, at James Watt’s request, he spent some time brewing on the pilot kit up at Brewdog HQ in Ellon. The big catalyst was then giving his homebrew to James and the way that not only he reacted but the whole company. “It sent a shockwave through the company” that someone in one of their bars could be brewing beer to that standard. James even said that trying this homebrew was the highlight of his time working in the bar in Birmingham!

The other thing to come out of this encounter was Josh and Neil Hemus starting the homebrew club with Josh being the sole organiser after Neil Hemus moved on. He told me that Brewdog had really wanted him to stay up in Ellon but he found the process too automated and that he wanted to get his hands dirty – that’s what brewing means to him. So that’s how Glasshouse was born.

They started on October 21st 2016 in a greenhouse in Kings Heath and if you’re wondering how the brewery got its name it’s all thanks to Josh’s niece who said “are you in the brewery today? You’re in the glasshouse brewery” and Glasshouse Beer Co. was born!

After getting set up from October the first beer was released in March this year and that’s when the brewery is really counting its birthday (so look out for celebrations next March!).

We moved on then to talk more about the brewery itself and their general ethos. Glasshouse is pretty much just Josh, he does all the recipe development and is the head brewer. He’s also assisted by Callum Marnock who’s been part of the team from the start. They are currently brewing on a one barrel kit, but a five and half barrel kit will be operational early in November with 20 barrels worth of fermentation vessels and at least one bright tank (maybe 2). The plan is to move away from keg and bottle conditioning to forced carbonation, the reason for this is to ensure the consistency of the beer. Josh told me though that they now plan to cease bottling for 2 reasons one “it’s a pain in the arse” and secondly once the new kit is up and running they’re moving into canning.

Me with Josh and Julie

I asked Josh about the breweries approach to styles and having a core range of beers as I’ve noticed that there are only a couple of his beers I’ve had more than once. “We’ve adopted a real Kernel and Cloudwater approach to experimentation. Not weighing ourselves down with a core range”. He said that he hates the labelling of beer with it having to be defined as one style or another “it’s so much more than that. I don’t like the distinction of west coast or east coast pales for example. If you want to brew a dank juicy IPA with loads of flaked oats –giving a juicy body and clean finish then go for it” There are lots of people doing this at the moment and he cited a few idols such as Deya, Verdant and Cloudwater. However he did say that sometimes he finds their beers too sweet, and since he’s a committed “hop fiend” he wants to show off the hops. He told me that he “spends time on the malt bill, so the hops can shine through. If it’s an IPA the hops should be at the front of the beer.”. Of course it can’t all be about the hops so the chocolate milk stout and, the frankly delicious, Me Julie shows they are not a one trick pony.

I moved on to ask Josh why we weren’t seeing so much of his beer around at the moment. It’s all down to his high levels of quality control “as the head brewer I have had to ensure the CO2 levels, the hop flavour over time and the way the flavour profile matures are all measured and controlled. I’ve kept stock back looking at it with a longer view.” Sometimes this has gone wrong and he’s held it back too long but that allows for the setting of a realistic best before date and will help with proper stock rotation once it gets to the bars. He also said this gives a baseline for the move to the big kit. “Ensuring that when the beer is released it’s at its optimum freshness, and that the flavour and aroma profile and CO2 levels are all perfect”.

He told me how his current role working at Clink has actually helped him with this quality control process “launching at Clink gets me unbiased feedback on the beer, 99.9% of the people drinking there don’t know I’m Glasshouse so I get unfiltered feedback direct from the customers”. He said

“It’s an ongoing research and development, it’s an ongoing discipline there is always something you can learn”.

I for one am really excited about the beers I’ve tried so far as well and the real passion and knowledge Josh displays for his craft.

I’ve got an invite to go and visit the brewery once the new kit is all up and running so watch this space for an update nearer the end of the year.

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